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Of Special Interest
   
 


Black-horned and Forbes' tree cricket nymphs are difficult to tell apart - they both have white dashes and spots.

...and often have a dark area down the center.


Some Forbes' have thick yellowish areas along the outer edges of the dorsal abdomen.


Forbes':  Yellow thick strokes with very few spots.

This female Forbes' has a few more spots along with the yellowish lines along the side.


This young 4-spotted has a very distinct pattern.  Note the whitish lines running down the sides, the darker strip down the middle, and the whitish edge to the dark strip.

This female 4-spotted still has hints of a darker area down the center bordered by white lines.


This Fast-calling female has neither lines or spots, but rather dashes.

Davis':  Thick yellowish circles

Narrow-winged:  Thick white loops and spots

Broad-winged tree crickets have a strip of red patterning on the abdomen.  Note the  < > marks. 

Snowy:  White spots and dashes

Western:  Wide dark line down center with slightly lighter bordering lines.

Walker's tree cricket has prominent white on the outer edges.

Alexander's tree cricket has dots and dashes in a scattered pattern.