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Key to ID of U.S. Species
Alexander's -- alexanderi
Black-horned -- nigricornis
Broad-winged -- latipennis
Davis' -- exclamationis
Different-horned -- varicornis
Fast-calling -- celerinictus
Forbes' -- forbesi
4-spotted - quadripuinctatus
Narrow-winged -- niveus
Pine -- pini
Prairie -- argentinus
Riley's -- rileyi
Snowy -- fultoni
Tamarack -- laricis
Texas -- texensis
Thin-lined -- leptogrammus
Walker's -- walkeri
Western -- californicus
Oecanthus major
Two-spotted - N. bipunctata
Allard's (tropical)
Nicaraguan Oecanthus x3
Nicaragua Neoxabea x2
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Warm up singing
Synchronous songs
Of Special Interest
   
 


There are three different species singing: 
The intermittent rolling chirp is Oecanthus allardi.
The intermittent short bursts of trilling is Oecanthus leptogrammus.
The continuous trilling is a new species - Baker's tree cricket.


A total of 5 new species from Nicaragua were described in the Transactions of the American Entomological Society. http://taes.entomology-aes.org/pages/show/products-2


 

Oecanthus bakeri.  The common name is deemed Baker's tree cricket.

Note the orange on the head and joints -- and pale antennae.


Frontal view of the base of the antennae.


Note the black spot on the 'knee' joint and the black slash marks on the femur.

Note the female to the left of the male behind the leaf.  You can see her right-sided limbs and her ovipositor.

This species makes a continuous trill. 
[Note: Videos will not play with Microsoft Edge]


Female - note the dark slash marks on the femurs.

This young nymph of new species #1 was found within 2 feet of the above adult male.  The pattern on the top surface of the abdomen matches those in the varicornis group.



Oecanthus symesi.  The common name is deemed Golden tree cricket.

This is the male.  Note the golden yellow color and VERY narrow wings.


This is the female Golden tree cricket.





Oecanthus belti.  The common name is deemed Belt's tree cricket.

The male has coloring similar to that of O. varicornis in the U.S., however, note the narrow wings.

The female looks very similar to O. varicornis in the U.S.




Below are waveforms of three species:  Snowy, Alexander's and Allard's found in Nicaragua.  The top waveforms are a series of chirps; the bottom waveforms are the number of pulses in a single chirp.  One can see the differences in the number of pulses with each chirp for these three species.

The top waveform shows 15 seconds of chirping; the bottom shows a single burst/chirp



FOR COMPARISONS:

O. fultoni (Snowy tree cricket) waveforms  --   Top pair of waveforms show 10 seconds of chirping;  Bottom waveforms show 3 chirps.



 O. alexanderi (Alexander's tree cricket )  14 seconds of chirping then 1 burst/chirp






This Oecanthus leptogrammus female was found on vegetation under a huge Guasimos tree.


Note the whitish background and black marking on the antennal segment.


Another view of the whitish background and black mark on the 1st antennal segment.  Note the very thin black mark - hence the common name of Thin-lined tree cricket.