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Key to ID of U.S. Species
Alexander's -- alexanderi
Black-horned -- nigricornis
Broad-winged -- latipennis
Davis' -- exclamationis
Different-horned -- varicornis
Fast-calling -- celerinictus
Forbes' -- forbesi
Four-spotted -- quadripuinctatus
Narrow-winged -- niveus
Pine -- pini
Prairie -- argentinus
Riley's -- rileyi
Snowy -- fultoni
Tamarack -- laricis
Texas -- texensis
Thin-lined -- leptogrammus
Walker's -- walkeri
Western -- californicus
Two-spotted - N. bipunctata
Allard's (tropical)
Nicaraguan Oecanthus x3
Nicaragua Neoxabea x2
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Warm up singing
Synchronous songs
Of Special Interest
   
 


Songs of male tree crickets are analyzed by counting the pulses per second or chirping pattern.   Species in the nigricornis and varicornis groups are measured by counting the pulses per second.   Members of the genus Neoxabea, as well as species of the niveus group of the genus Oecanthus, are measured by the number of pulses per second within a burst.   Species in the rileyi group are analyzed by the pattern of pulses in each chirp.  Special attention is made of the number of chirps per minute -- as it is possible to estimate the temperature using a special formula involving the number of chirps.

  

CONTINUOUS TRILLING FOR 7 SECONDS

Four-spotted


INTERMITTENT BURSTS OF TRILLING IN 10 SECOND SPAN




INTERMITTENT CHIRPING OVER 7 SECOND PERIOD

Snowy




This is the sound analysis waveform for the song of the 4-spotted tree cricket:  41 pulses per second.

Four-spotted



Below is the song of the Pine tree cricket:  36 pulses in one second at 19.8 C

Pine



Below is the song of the Black-horned tree cricket.  Count the number of pulses in this one-second span.

Black-horned



This is the song of the Forbes' tree cricket -- another continuous trilling pattern.

Forbes



This is a sound analysis waveform for the Fast-calling tree cricket.

Fast-calling



Here is a one second portion of the song of a Western tree cricket.

Western



This is a one-second portion of the song of the Narrow-winged tree cricket.

Narrow-winged


Below is a one second portion from a burst of trilling by a Davis' tree cricket.



This is one second from a burst of trilling by the Two-spotted tree cricket.

Two-spotted


Two chirps in a one second span from the Snowy tree cricket.  Note the 2 - 3 - 3 pattern of pulses.

Snowy


Prolonged chirp of Alexander's tree cricket in a one-second span.                         Note the 2 - 3 - 3 - 3 - 3 - 3 - 3 pattern.

Alexander's


An even longer 'chirp' of Oecanthus allardi which was found in Nicaragua.      Note the 2 - 3 - 3 - 3 - 3 - 3 - 3 - 3 - 3 pattern.   Analysis of a long string of chirps showed that the number of '3's varied from 5 - 11.

WORLD SPECIES