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Of Special Interest
   
 

BEHAVIOR

Tree crickets display a variety of interesting behaviors.  Most of what is offered on this page is from direct observations of tree crickets I have encountered or raised. 

[Note: Videos will not play with Microsoft Edge]

This Narrow-winged tree cricket is eating commercial cricket food powder.  This little creature is almost cat-like in the manner it is eating.



This male is scouting his surroundings before literally taking a 'flying leap' -- tree crickets initially leap and use their wings to guide them.


This male Neoxabea bipunctata extends his forewings and hindwings before taking a short flight.

This is a female O. celerinictus and a male O. walkeri.  They were placed in the same vase to rule out the male being O. celerinictus.  The female spent over a minute touching the male with her antennae -- and seemed to be enticing him to sing and offer her access to his metanotal gland.  He did not, however, seem interested in her.  After a while, as if to tell her "Go away, I'm not your kind" -- he gave a short trill.  She in turn, seemed to realize by his song that he was not her species -- turned around -- and paid him no further attention.


This female Tamarack tree cricket uses her forearm to groom an antenna.

























This male Forbes' tree cricket pursued this wasp for more than 15 minutes. The wasp never acted aggressive toward the tree cricket, despite his continual attempts to position himself so the wasp could sip from his metanotal gland. The wasp would simply turn and move to another blossom.