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This little nymph is less than 1 hour old.

 

This newborn tree cricket's antennae have not yet completely released to a fully extended position.


This little tree cricket is about 10 minutes old -- and is trying out his antennae for the first time.


Newly emerged nymphs are about 3mm in length from the tip of their face to the back tip of their abdomen.



Some tree crickets are brown, thus blend in well with darker colored leaves and stems.   This little tree cricket grew up to be a Western tree cricket -- brown form.



This is a closer look at the pattern on a very young Western tree cricket.



This nymph is a tree cricket that was found in Nicaragua.  It appears to be from the varicornis group (the same group as the Western tree cricket.)


This young tree cricket was found in southern Texas,  It was later determined to be a new species - Oecanthus walkeri.


This little nymph emerged from the stem of a Goldenrod plant.  It is a member of the nigricornis group of species.


Even at a very young age, it is easy to guess this is O. niveus or Narrow-winged tree cricket. It is long and slender with a translucent green color. Note those black 'feet'. A similar looking O. exclamationis would have a golden head and be a translucent whitish color rather than green.





Nymphs of the Two-spotted tree cricket look distinctly different from other species.  They have a reddish-brown head and brownish back.