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Of Special Interest
   
 


Tree crickets prefer to oviposit their eggs in sturdy or woody stems.  This photo shows the holes made by a female tree cricket in the stem of a French Broom plant.


This little tree cricket has just emerged from the stem of a French Broom plant found near Bon Tempe Lake in California.


The blossoms of the French Broom plant look like yellow sweet peas; while the leaves resemble clover.  It is easy to see in this photo that there is an abundance of plant fibers for tree crickets to eat.


This female O. forbesi had oviposited more than 20 eggs into this tall Goldenrod stem.  She is trying to 'hide' from my camera by assuming a flattened profile along the side of the stem.


This is the stem from a Goldenrod plant which has many holes drilled into it by a female Forbes' tree cricket.  You can also see a bit of chewed plant material used to plug up the holes. 

The profile of oviposited stems often looks frayed.

This stem from a chrysanthemum plant has 6 eggs laid into it.  This stem allows one to more easily see the 'plugs' placed in each hole by the female Four-spotted tree cricket.


A female Forbes' tree cricket laid dozens of eggs into stems of a Red-twig Dogwood shrub.  The spaces between holes is a bit irregular.


The female that laid these eggs used more precise spacing between holes.  Tree cricket eggs in the northern states overwinter inside the stems -- this is why the females look for sturdy or woody stems.

 The lower holes in this Goldenrod stem are sealed up - indicating the tree crickets have not yet emerged.  This stem was found in March -- thus the eggs are waiting for the following summer to hatch.  The uppermost hole is open and large -- suggesting a parasitic wasp emerged the previous season.  Some wasps are parasitic and only lay their eggs in the eggs of tree crickets.


 

The female O. nigricornis who laid these eggs was very precise -- the holes are nicely spaced and in a straight row.



The three marks on the lower right were made by a female N. bipunctata.  This Two-spotted female tree cricket drilled channels into a 2 inch diameter apple tree branch to lay her eggs.  Each hole has a 'plug' in the center.  Note the natural small knobs on the bark -- possibly the female laid her eggs near these spots as a form of camouflage since her oviposit holes are similar in appearance.


This is a female Pine tree cricket putting her eggs inside a very slender stem.

These holes are on a very slender twig of a grapevine plant.

                                                                                               
These tiny holes were made on grapevine by a female Two-spotted tree cricket.  Each hole is likely to have several eggs laid side by side.


Although difficult to spot amongst the 'spikes' on this pine stem, there are several oviposit markings made by a female Pine tree cricket.

Oecanthus forbesi often oviposit their eggs into galls on Canada Goldenrod stems.