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Key to ID of U.S. Species
Alexander's -- alexanderi
Black-horned -- nigricornis
Broad-winged -- latipennis
Davis' -- exclamationis
Different-horned -- varicornis
Fast-calling -- celerinictus
Forbes' -- forbesi
4-spotted - quadripuinctatus
Narrow-winged -- niveus
Pine -- pini
Prairie -- argentinus
Riley's -- rileyi
Snowy -- fultoni
Tamarack -- laricis
Texas -- texensis
Thin-lined -- leptogrammus
Walker's -- walkeri
Western -- californicus
Oecanthus major
Two-spotted - N. bipunctata
Allard's (tropical)
Nicaraguan Oecanthus x3
Nicaragua Neoxabea x2
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Warm up singing
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Of Special Interest
   
 


Watch closely....you will see the spermatophore appear at the distal tip of the male's abdomen.  He grasps the female using two 'claspers' -- as they bend their bodies toward each other.  This spermatophore seems to drop into place -- but actually the male has inserted the tube portion of the spermatophore into an opening on the female.  Once in place, the two separate very quickly.  The male, however, will continue to sing in order to keep the female occupied with drinking from his metanotal gland.  This is intended to distract her from removing the spermatophore too quickly.  Once the sperm have drained from the spermatophore, the female detaches the sac with her mouth and eats the case. 
[Note: Videos will not play with Microsoft Edge]


This spermatophore appears whitish.  The female removed it shortly after this photo was taken -- suggesting the sperm had emptied.


This Four-spotted female actually has two spermatophores attached in the same opening.


Here is another female with 2 spermatophores attached (one each from 2 different males.)



This Pine tree cricket female continues to feed from the male's metanotal gland -- even though the pinkish spermatophore has already been transferred.  Note the tube-like stem.


This female is allowing the sperm to drain from the spermatophore into her seminal receptacle.  Within 15 minutes, she plucked it out using her mouth, and ate the entire sac.  This is routine post-copulatory behavior for female tree crickets.  This behavior can be seen in the short video below. 
[Note: Videos will not play with Microsoft Edge]