HOME
TAXONOMY
SPECIES
Species by Continent
ANATOMY
EGGS
HOST STEMS
HATCHING
NYMPHS
INSTARS
Abdomen patterns
SINGING MALES
Metanotal Glands
POSTER
Key to ID
Two-spotted
Black-horned
Forbes'
Pine
Tamarack
Fast-calling
Four-spotted
Prairie
Snowy
Riley's
Alexander's
Narrow-winged
Broad-winged
Davis'
Different-horned
Western
Texas
Walker's
Nicaraguan species
World species
MATING
SPERMATOPHORE
OVIPOSITION
MOLTING
LIFE CYCLE
BEHAVIORS
PREDATORS/PARASITOIDS
HABITATS
LOCATIONS
SOUND ANALYSIS
WHO'S WHO
HISTORY
SCIENTIFIC DATA
GLOSSARY
LINKS
Contact Us
Warm up singing
Synchronous songs
Of Special Interest
   
 



Similar in appearance to Snowy tree cricket; however, note the absence of red / orange on the head.


Below are video clips of Oecanthus alexanderi, TJ Walker 2011  
[Note: Videos will not play with Microsoft Edge]


The limbs and antennae are very pale; the tegmina are wide.



This nymph is a couple of days old.


The bright white spots seem to have a more regular pattern than those on Snowy TC.


Small wing buds are a sign this tree cricket is in the 4th instar stage.


This male is in the 5th instar stage.  Note the swelling of the wing sacs.

Description:  Body length 15.6 mm; tegminal length 19.0, width 6.1; pronotal length 2.1, rear width 2.3; hind femur 7.6.

Round or oval dark mark on an ivory swelling on the ventral surface of each of the first two antennal segments, and their calling songs consist of chirps or brief trills produced at a highly regular rate. Within each chirp or trill, the pulses, which correspond to individual tegminal closings, occur in groups of three, except that the first group usually has two pulses rather than three.