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Key to ID of U.S. Species
Alexander's -- alexanderi
Black-horned -- nigricornis
Broad-winged -- latipennis
Davis' -- exclamationis
Different-horned -- varicornis
Fast-calling -- celerinictus
Forbes' -- forbesi
Four-spotted -- quadripuinctatus
Narrow-winged -- niveus
Pine -- pini
Prairie -- argentinus
Riley's -- rileyi
Snowy -- fultoni
Tamarack -- laricis
Texas -- texensis
Thin-lined -- leptogrammus
Walker's -- walkeri
Western -- californicus
Two-spotted - N. bipunctata
Allard's (tropical)
Nicaraguan Oecanthus x3
Nicaragua Neoxabea x2
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Warm up singing
Synchronous songs
Of Special Interest
   
 


    Described and named by Thomas J. Walker in 1962 (in honor of B. B. Fulton)

The Snowy tree cricket chirps rather than trill -- and the speed depends on the temperature.  On hot summer nights, they chirp rapidly.  On cool autumn evenings, they chirp much slower.  The pulse rates of the songs of all tree crickets quicken and slow down depending on the temperature -- but only the chirping rate of the Snowy tree cricket is evident to the human ear. 
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Note the wide distal wings, orange on the head, and black dots within white fields on the base of the antennae.


Description by Thomas J. Walker.