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Warm up singing
Synchronous songs
Of Special Interest
   
 



If you look carefully, so can see the wings moving up against the hole in the leaf as the male sings.  This species commonly makes a hole the same size and shape of his opened wings -- so that when he sings, the wings are flush with the leaf.  This amplifies the volume of his singing -- a self-made baffle.
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This photo shows several leaves from one branch of grapevine with holes made by a male Neoxabea bipunctata. Note they are the same general size, shape and on the same quadrant of each leaf.


Male Neoxabea bipunctata.


Female Neoxabea bipunctata.  The 'knob' is visible on the pedicel of the right-sided antenna.

























Knob seen through a microscope.  (Neoxabea ottei from Nicaragua)


This is the male Two-spotted tree cricket who sent me on my journey in 2006 to find out more about the little bug that was making so much noise on my patio.  He chewed the hole in this sunflower leaf - an exact size and shape of his opened wings - to act as a baffle or amplifier for his song.

Nice view of the metanotal gland as the male raises his wings to sing.








































Tree crickets in the genus Neoxabea use a different mating tactic than those in the genus Oecanthus.  Oecanthus species grasp onto vegetation with all 6 limbs. Neoxabean males grasp vegetation with their 4 front limbs and the back 2 limbs dangle down; Neoxabean females grasp onto the male with their front limbs. They flail around as they dangle downward - probably to keep the female from prematurely removing the spermatophore.



Video of a Two-spotted male tree cricket taking flight - quite possibly the first time this has been caught on video for this species. 
[Note: Videos will not play with Microsoft Edge]

Description by Charles DeGeer.