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Of Special Interest
   
 



Two weeks prior to this photo, this female O. nigricornis was a healthy tree cricket -- slender silhouette and light green in color.  One day after this photo was taken, she expired.  Note the grossly distended abdomen.  (See photo below.)

This horsehair worm was found in the container with the deceased female in the above photo.  It measured 4cm in length.


It is possible this strand-like object is normal anatomy for a young female tree cricket -- but based on the above photos, might it be some type of worm?



This 3.5mm long  fully-developed wasp  was found inside a twig alongside hatched and unhatched tree cricket eggs.   Several wasp species are known to parasitize tree cricket eggs.

This wasp was ID'd as parasitic Apocrita » Platygastroidea » Platygastridae » Scelioninae » Oethecoctonus » Oethecoctonus oecanthi                                        See at:  http://bugguide.net/node/view/431906#849940

Close-up view of the head and thorax of the parasatoid found in the twig with tree cricket eggs.

This photo shows the wasp inside a tree cricket egg. These wasps are only 2.5mm long.

Parasitic
wasp
inside
tree
cricket
egg.


Mites take advantage of empty tree cricket eggs inside stems.  The top portion of this picture held two more mites within the shell.


Although this is not a good photo, one is still able to see the limbs of a Two-spotted tree cricket instar as this Isodontia elegans wasp drags it off to its nest.

This wasp lit on this branch for only a few seconds and happened to land in a brightly lit spot -- therefore these photos are not ideal.  However, one can see the limbs and the underside of this N. bipunctata instar -- as well as its two hind legs dangling below the branch.

These nests are commonly being built in the space between crank open windows and the window frame.

These were found in an above window nest of Isodontia apicalis.  See photo below (of tree cricket on far right).

This tiny little Snowy tree cricket youngster was paralyzed and placed in a wasp nest to feed their larvae.